Tall and Skinny VS. Short and Stout?



*NOTE: RRW™ supports ALL women, regardless of size. Skinny girls are real women, too. We just don’t like it when big corporations tell us being thin is the only way to attain confidence and beauty.*

New York Fashion Week is in full swing thanks in large part to one of their biggest sponsors, PepsiCo, Inc. In addition to getting the usual exposure, Pepsi has used its sponsorship as an opportunity to promote its soon-to-be launched, newly designed Diet Pepsi product – ‘The Skinny Can.’


It’s easy to envision why Pepsi would choose such an event to introduce its cute little can. Where else would there be such an obvious visual correlation between idealized size and beauty (i.e. models on the runway) and a taller, skinnier can of DIET, zero calorie soda? OMG! Perrrfeeect… *sigh*





The AP reports: The can is a "taller, sassier" version of the traditional can that the company says was made in "celebration of beautiful, confident women."

[cue screeching car tires!]

WOAH. Hold it right there. OK. Let’s work out the simple equation for that.

Skinny Can of Diet Pepsi + Woman = Confidence and Beauty

Wow! Is it really just that easy? Sold!

So, correct me if I’m wrong, Pepsi, but essentially you’re saying that taller and thinner women are the only ones who should feel confident in their beauty? Really? Wow.

Let’s try that out in another equation, shall we?

Confident, Beautiful Women = Tall + Thin

Yeeeah. REAL empowering. REAL inclusive.

From all available press and photos, it would seem that everywhere attendees turn, they’re greeted with a reminder from Pepsi that thinner is better.



Picture this – Skinny Can signage strewn about various fashion week venues and shows. Celebrities, designers and models being photographed incessantly holding the thin can acting as if it’s the absolute BEST thing they’ve ever tasted (and hey, who am I to judge – maybe it is?). A hip lounge/bar dubbed ‘The Skinny Bar’ where you can order a ‘Skinny Cocktail’ and hang with the cool crowd. Pepsi logo-covered information displays with ‘Get the Skinny!’ splashed across their signs. VIP gift bags filled with all kinds of goodies including, you guessed it, Skinny Cans!. TV displays made to look like backstage, dressing room mirrors playing looped footage of extraordinarily thin models walking down runways. Get the connection? Drink Diet Pepsi. Look into the mirror. Look.like.this.

Let’s be clear, this was all on purpose. When it comes to marketing, don’t think these kinds of details are left out, because they aren’t. Pepsi specifically chose this as their venue for a reason. Everything is looks-based, including their sizist can.

What baffles me is their denial of the ‘thin’ connection. Especially considering the ONLY Pepsi product being produced in ‘The New Skinny Can!’ is a diet soft drink with its advertised ‘ZERO Cals, Carbs & Sug!’ slapped right on the front of the can. In an email, the company wrote:

‘We are sensitive to this interpretation, and that is definitely not our intent.’


Pepsi, we’re calling your bluff. And we’re going to get many, many others to do the same.

Let’s make a deal!


Jill Beraud, Pepsi’s Chief Marketing Officer, has stated that their ‘slim, attractive new can is the perfect complement to today’s most stylish looks.’

Well, then! If a cute little ACCESSORY is all you’re going for, I think we may have just found our compromise, Pepsi. All of this fuss could go away and you could make lots of money on a product that doesn’t piss off your customers if you go with one of two options.

Option ONE:

You drop this campaign and the new can all together. Immediately.

OR

Option TWO:

You drop the bull about the ‘Skinny Can’ celebrating ‘confident, beautiful women’ and immediately plan to sell regular Pepsi (full of calories, sugar and carbs, oh my!) in your ‘Skinny Can’ as well. That way, we lose the Skinny = Beautiful baggage AND it becomes more about a stylish, trendy little can that has nothing to do with a woman’s size.


Bonus Round!

And a few more ways you could better your campaign:

First – Your plan to have Sofia Vergara as a spokesperson will go MUCH smoother if you show her drinking REAL Pepsi. She’s a woman who openly celebrates her body and having her selling a diet soda pushing the thin ideal isn’t exactly consistent messaging.

Second – We hear you’re planning on providing designer clothing boutiques in cities across the country with mini fridge displays stocked with Diet Pepsi Skinny Cans (yet again, proof that this IS about size). Why don’t you go out on a limb, take a chance, and make THIS empowering move: Stock those fridges with Diet Pepsi and regular Pepsi. The Fashion Industry is not one that generally embraces women of all sizes. Even if you keep the Skinny Can and drop its association with tallness, thinness & beauty, having both products there will send a message. That REAL WOMEN of ANY size can drink your products and be beautiful, stylish and confident.

I may have studied MUSIC Business and Management in college, but I’ll have you know, Pepsi, that in one of my marketing classes, I did a project where you were the chosen company under which I drew up a marketing plan to launch a new drink because you’re a dynamic, innovative, daring brand. Don’t tarnish your name like this. Do the right thing.

HOW TO CONTACT PEPSI:

Let the folks behind the Diet Pepsi Skinny Can know what YOU think!

Diet Pepsi on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/DietPepsi (Use hashtags #skinnycan #protest #RRW)
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DietPepsi

Send your Letters/Emails to these email addresses:

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

©2011 REVOLUTION OF REAL WOMEN, LLC. All rights reserved.

PETA can't seem to help themselves. I mean, with so many women in the world there's just too little time to abuse and exploit all of our bodies and self-esteem... all in the name of animal rights! Riiiiiight....

We're really getting sick of having to report on this sort of garbage, but because it's important that people are informed of the disrespectful tactics companies and media are using to promote products and campaigns, we feel a responsibility to inform you. And let's be honest -- the production quality on PETA's latest stunt is SO bad it's embarrassing. Really going for the at-home, do-it-yourself porn look are we, PETA?

They've angered us before, but this time, PETA has taken things to an entirely new level. It's one thing to see the final product, an offensive, yet polished ad, poster or commercial, but what we have here is a sketchy behind-the-scenes sneak peek (no pun intended) of what went into one of their oh-so-brilliant campaigns.


Girl smashing tomatoes all over herself. Pssst.... Hey PETA! Just so you know, tomatoes are FRUIT.


Remember this a while back? PETA's banned 'Veggie Sex' Super Bowl ad showcasing women lusting after and rubbing vegetables all of their bodies, all in an effort to encourage the public to 'Go VEG' because 'vegetarians have better sex.' Albeit degrading and flat out ridiculous, the production quality was much better than one might have expected. That being said, instead of doing another one this year, they decided to go an even trashier route and post edited clips of women auditioning for the 'Veggie Sex' ad. The viewer watches as a male directs mostly naked women to stand before the camera and show their bodies from the front, side and finally turn in a full 360 degrees. Then we hear a man say, 'Why don't you pick a vegetable and show us how much you love it.'

Seeing that PETA is an organization whose mission is supposedly compassionate towards other living things, it boggles our minds that they continue to take the trashy, degrading marketing route that they do. Seeing an actual recording of ordinary women being used and played with for the male gaze and enjoyment is really upsetting. But by an animal rights organization???

Without further adieu, you may view the new video here. PLEASE watch at your own discretion for the content is graphic in nature.

 

©2011 REVOLUTION OF REAL WOMEN, LLC. Al rights reserved.

We often talk about the importance of media literacy and paying attention to the messages we're fed daily. It's tough enough combating unabashedly offensive, in-your-face advertising, but what happens when the news we get is misrepresented and tainted with underlying 'isms'?

WHAT DOES THE HEADLINE/IMAGE (BELOW) SAY TO YOU? WHAT DO YOU THINK IT MEANS? WHAT DOES IT IMPLY?


[Source: HuffingtonPost.com 1.26.11]

Here's why we're asking...

We probably had similar reactions... This looks like it's probably going to be a story tying kids' food choices and ability to abstain from indulging in 'bad foods' to their potential as adults later in life. Right?

Wrong.

The actual story is about a study linking a child's self-control (unrelated to food) and conscientiousness to their potential for leading a more successful life free of prison, drugs and unplanned children. Well, thanks to HuffingtonPost.com, that got lost in translation.

In fact, not only did the actual point of the study get lost in a huge game of 'Media Telephone,' but now the story is being portrayed in a way that subliminally suggests (in both image and word) that depriving oneself of 'junk food' (in order to attain a specific size or status?) will lead to a better, wealthier life. Taken another step further, does this NOT also bring up issues of socioeconomic status? What foods are made affordable and available to whom...? What about issues of sexism (women expected to be 'good' and stereotypically beautiful/thin)? What about an underlying issue of race? If we don't ask these questions, how else will society begin to realize just how intricately sizism, sexism and racism are still woven into our culture?

Just because a news source has taken one statement, put it at the top of a page and published it in a size 20, bold face font, does not make it true -- nor does it make it right.

HuffPost #Fail? Uh, yeah.

To read the original article, go here.

 

©2011 REVOLUTION OF REAL WOMEN, LLC. All rights reserved.

Crystal Renn's behind-the-scene photo reveals a much different story than the one pushed out through the media recently...

Besides the obvious size retrouching, the photographer, Nicholas Routzen, angered us by saying:

'I'm paid to make women look beautiful.'

So, Nicholas, does that mean you equate size with beauty? #FAIL

Crystal Renn retouched in recent skinny pictures, she says...


[HuffingtonPost.com]

©2010 REVOLUTION OF REAL WOMEN, LLC. All rights reserved.



Vaseline is the latest of major beauty companies to anger and offend consumers. In an effort to market its newest skin whitening/bleaching cream, Vaseline has launched a new Facebook application that allows users to lighten their skin color in their profile pictures. These products are often very dangerous and unregulated, yet their popularity continues to rise as both western influences infiltrate their society and mass media in their own countries continue to independently accept and advertise these same ideals.

Vaseline Debuts Skin-Whitening Facebook App in India:

http://www.styleite.com/beauty/vaseline-skin-whitening-cream/

[Styleite.com]
[Salon.com]

©2010 REVOLUTION OF REAL WOMEN, LLC. All rights reserved.

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